2Kw Wind Turbine that can be tied right to your electrical panel. This is a great system with high technology to save you thousands yearly! Purchase This Aero Brand New 2kw Wind Turbine Generator - Complete System Today! Limited Quantities Available! Call 1-866-606-3991. Purchase This WG1.5KW 48V Wind Turbine Generator Complete Power System (Controller and Inverter Included)  Today! Limited Quantities Available! Call 1-866-606-3991.
30 Mar 2012 at 4:19pm --> . . WE have a healthy base of customers, installers, and dealers who can assist you with your home energy system. Wind and Solar is our specialty. Our Solar and Wind Home Energy Kits are installed in about 40 states of the US already. //www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrf–4-uM3s This Ohio Demo System of the RoofMill? for WindEnergy7 was […]

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed a tool called PVWatts for this purpose. It estimates the energy production and cost of energy of grid-connected PV energy systems for any address in the world. It allows homeowners, small building owners, installers, and manufacturers to easily develop estimates of the performance of potential PV installations, and can even compare solar’s cost to utility bills. These tools are great for getting started, but make sure to work with a solar installer for a custom estimate of how much power your solar energy system is likely to generate.
If you mess something up during the installation, even something minor, you’ll bear the full weight of all the additional costs that result. Remember – this is about cost savings, and if solar panel kits actually deliver any. So, what happens if you make a minor mistake when you wire your panels to your inverter, and the inverter malfunctions a few years later?

While I think on a personal level, distributed solar/storage is great, it just doesn’t seem to scale on a system level, since there is a lot of economies of scale in terms of cost (compare $1/W utility PV vs. $2-3/W rooftop PV), and a lot of benefits from geographical diversity, both in terms of load (your load is way more spikey than CO’s average load), and renewables (while your solar array might be doing bad during a cloudy winter day, the wind could be howling at a wind farm in Iowa or it could be sunny in New Mexico). If we really want to go 100% carbon free, we will need all the geographical diversity and economies of scale that we can. A bunch of people with rooftop solar + a battery won’t cut it sadly.
“I don’t live in Colorado. How much juice will I get out of it where I live?” This part is fun: The National Renewable Energy Lab runs a great, free calculator called PVWatts that does it all for you: factoring in average weather and solar angles in your area, even allowing you to specify solar panels placed at any crazy angle you like. (In other words, your house doesn’t have to have a perfect South-facing roof).

Another thing to double-check on DSIRE is the installation requirement for any incentive programs you may apply for. Although I'm sure that the most Instructables users will opt for a DIY solar installation, you may not be qualified for state or local grants if you don't hire a government-approved contractor to do it for you. That said, a do-it-yourself solar project is both fun and rewarding! Check out the further reading for some advice on DIY solar.
As the section above shows, anything under 5 m/s annual average wind speed is not going to be worth-while if you want any economic benefit out of a wind turbine. Even with government incentives, you would be better off with solar for most places. Let us take this a bit further, and assume your backyard is pretty windy, a full 6 m/s (13.4 mph) annual average wind speed at 100′ height. You get a 6 kW wind turbine installed, and shell out $50,000 for that privilege. If the installer did her job properly, the turbine is spinning in nice, clean, laminar air, and it will produce around 13,000 kWh per year. You are the kind of person that wins the lottery on a regular basis, marries a beauty queen (or king), and has kids that all go to ivy-league universities; your wind turbine never breaks and you do not have to shell out a single buck for maintenance over 20 years. Now your turbine has produced around 260,000 kWh of electricity, which works out to 19.2 cents per kWh in cost. Maybe you pay more than for electricity and it is worth it, but your are likely not getting rich, and any repairs and maintenance will drive that price up in a hurry.
Preppers, survivalists and off-gridders have been cobbling together their own photovoltaic panels and set-ups from scratch for years, but as prices for factory-made PV panels have dropped and technology has improved, pre-configured arrays and kits are enabling less intrepid homeowners to install and maintain their own solar power systems and save considerable money in the process. 
Square wave inverter is cheaper among the all but not suitable for all appliances.Modified Sine Wave output is also not suitable for certain appliances, particularly those with capacitive and electromagnetic devices such as: a fridge, microwave oven and most kinds of motors.Typically modified sine wave inverters work at lower efficiency than pure sine wave inverters.
Daily energy budget? It is NOT based on a homes sq. ft. It is NOT based on how many people are living in the house. It is based on the equipment or appliances you want to run and how long each day you typically run them. It does not get more individual than that. The amount of energy you and your family consumes each day will vary among individuals habits and personal choices.
Just like the solar energy industry, shortage of commodity has contributed to rising prices for the wind energy industry. The silver lining in the story is that an incredible increase in demand for turbines has contributed to rising costs. There are not enough manufacturers to make enough turbines or make them fast enough. Wind energy has finally been discovered by the masses as well as investors. It is clear that the wind industry will become a very profitable venture in the not-so-far future, and companies are plunging into the opportunity of being there as it happens.
How frustrating! Even in solar-backwards Virginia, HOAs are actually not permitted to STOP us from putting solar panels on our roofs. Maybe worth checking around and seeing if your state has something similar that will help over-rule this objection from your HOA? Might be something out there that the HOA doesn’t even know about – they often just reflexively say “no” without necessarily checking on what the most recent statutes say.
This solar kit is ideal for running items like small pumps and lights, and can be used for charging up your battery pack. There are 4 x 100w polycrystalline solar panels that connect up to a two diode junction for better performance. The charge controller that comes with the kit is also one of the better units that we have reviewed. The charger includes a 3 stage control, multi colored status LED, temperature compensation and a manual or automatic charge equalization feature. This kit is more expensive than the 400W Renogy as it comes with an inverter.
You start by monitoring your energy consumption. You need to have a good idea of how much energy you consume on the average day to determine how big of a solar energy system you’ll need. On top of that, you’ll also need to know how much money you have to spend – keeping in mind that the most expensive solar panels might not be the most cost effective for your needs.
Purchase Your Wind and Solar Hybrid Charge Controller Today! Limited Quantities Available! Call 1-866-606-3991. Purchase Your Wind Charge Controller  for WG400 Wind Generator Today! Limited Quantities Available! Call 1-866-606-3991. Purchase Your Wind Charge Controller  for WG400 Wind Generator Today! Limited Quantities Available! Call 1-866-606-3991.
Solar trackers increase the amount of energy produced per module at a cost of mechanical complexity and need for maintenance. They sense the direction of the Sun and tilt or rotate the modules as needed for maximum exposure to the light.[54][55] Alternatively, fixed racks hold modules stationary as the sun moves across the sky. The fixed rack sets the angle at which the module is held. Tilt angles equivalent to an installation's latitude are common. Most of these fixed racks are set on poles above ground.[56] Panels that face West or East may provide slightly lower energy, but evens out the supply, and may provide more power during peak demand.[57]
The majority of solar equipment is produced in China, with only 14 American manufacturers producing solar cell modules, according to a study published by the Brookings Institute in February of this year. However, as the price of solar equipment has been dropping at a rapid rate, the offset of the passed-along trade tax in the form of increased cost to the consumer is predicted to level out by the end of the year. By 2016, the number of solar installations had increased in the United States by 14 times what it was just six years prior, according to the study, lowering the cost of individual solar panels significantly, and that pattern continues through the current time.
Most utilities will have an information package and a person who specializes in the utility requirements. We found our local utility and code inspectors helpful and friendly. We didn’t pick up a hint of resistance from them regarding the idea of a homeowner-installed PV system. Permit costs and turnaround times were small. Check the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE) for information on rebates in your state.

Purchase Your Wind and Solar Hybrid Charge Controller Today! Limited Quantities Available! Call 1-866-606-3991. Purchase Your Wind Charge Controller  for WG400 Wind Generator Today! Limited Quantities Available! Call 1-866-606-3991. Purchase Your Wind Charge Controller  for WG400 Wind Generator Today! Limited Quantities Available! Call 1-866-606-3991.

We're guessing you wouldn't have come here if you didn't have a hunch they probably were. But just in case, let's review when solar systems are practical for homes and when they're not. If you own home or cabin and you have (or a tiny home who can be parked such that...) a roof that roughly points south (north if south of the equator) with no shading by trees, hills, other homes from around 9AM to 3PM, then you have some prime real estate for putting a solar system on.


Equipped with a 3-phase External Rectifier pigtail. This small black connector on the back of the unit allows you to run less costly 3-conductor wire to your battery location instead of large heavy battery cables in addition to lessening the voltage loss you get with DC power. Once at the battery location the 3-phase power is fed into the included Charge Controller and is converted to DC for connection to the battery.

I know this was posted two years ago, but Patrick K is so far off base, I had to reply. Incentives go to the homeowner, not the installer. Homeowners are allowed to do their own construction. Have you ever heard of owner-builder? I am installing my own solar (4kW system) for less than $7,500. An installer wants more than $20K. It is not that complicated, especially when using microinverters.

This is a well-built solar kit from Renogy, and it is capable in many different scenarios, from being installed on top of an RV or trailer, to being installed as part of a larger solar array, the Renogy 100 watt Solar Starter Kit is a solid choice. The panel is made from monocrystalline, which is a more efficient material than polycrystalline (smaller and lighter). This is because the yield of silicone is greater and of a more pure consistency on the mono panels as opposed to the poly panels. The kit comes with a charge controller, called the Renogy Wanderer, meaning that you can expand your installation up to 400w, or 4 panels at a later stage when you decide to increase your solar capacity. Some consumers have complained about the quality of the controller, but the company has recently upgraded the controller – the Wander is a good value and works for most people.
Great post! I’m new to MMM and came across this quite by accident, but I loved this post and felt compelled to give you some addtional information. I work in the energy services industry and know a lot about this at scale. I have wondered how it would work in a DIY situation and this was very helpful. Something that could be helpful for you would be a power monitoring system to show you how it is all working in a comprehensive system. I came across this company (based in Boulder, CO), http://www.egauge.net/, through work and am very interested in getting this technology into my projects. It may be a little higher priced for a residential/small commercial DIY, but very user friendly and informative. It will allow you to monitor the energy use (in/out) of every circuit in your panel so you know track how much you are producing, consuming and selling to your electric car chargers.

I normally don't write reviews but I am very pleased with the panels I got here. I purchased the first panel to keep a trailer battery and a few other things charged but I soon found more things to connect and added two more panels as needed. I'm now running my work trailer totally off solar and have three old batteries being charged to help when needed. I have a freezer and microwave, drill press and other tools plus music and the lights and no longer need to bother with finding a place to park near a power source or use a generator when I get to a job. very pleased.
Matched this PMA up with a Six-Pack of Air-X Blades after buying it on Ebay. The BladeSpeed was mindboggling and the Volt meter went to 110+ during one gust. Saturday, July 11th 2009 about 3:30 p.m. Mohawk Highlands N.Y. Average for the day was about 40-50v in 12-16mph winds. 11ft. Tower. I highly recommend this product. The mount is very sturdy and pivots perfectly on the (Teflon) washer. Excellent customer service, shipping, and packaging. I've been building these for about six months. I've experimented with many kinds of motor and blades.
For our review we have focused on 100W and 400W panel kits, which are most applicable to the RV/boating or small outbuilding applications that have smaller loads, but have also included advice on the best resources and options for large systems (3kWh – 5 kWh – Skip to section on larger systems). Most of the solar kits are also easily configurable to add additional panels as needed. If you are interested in solar panels for a boat, read our review of options as there are several flexible solar panels to consider.

In 2008, the New Hampshire legislature passed HB310, creating a framework for municipalities to regulate the construction of small-scale wind turbines. In compliance with HB310, the Office of Energy and Planning developed a technical bulletin on Small Wind Energy Systems, which includes a model ordinance to aid communities in drafting regulations that conform with state laws. Although some of these materials are specific to New Hampshire, they should assist anyone planning to install a small wind turbine.
A good article What could go wrong with self installation? Let me tell you a couple of things that go wrong if work is not done by professionals. If wiring is too small, you could get into problems instantly. Wiring could turn red hot ! What could possibly go wrong with 5,000 watts DC at 72 volts on a ground mount being touched by children after a rain ? What could go wrong with someone not familiar with Ohm’s law as it relates to cable size ? What could go wrong with using circuit breakers not designed for Direct Current, that fuse instead of open up ? What could go wrong with an inverter mounted where it can get wet in the rain ? What could go wrong with forgetting proper grounding ? What could go wrong with installing equipment that doesn’t isolate itself from the power line (during power outages) other than simply electrocuting the power lineman ? Do it yourself ? Better know what you are doing !
An off-grid inverter must supply enough power to meet the needs of all the appliances running simultaneously. Before selecting an inverter, you must know the watts your appliances will require and their amp and surge needs. Sizing an inverter for an off-grid system, which is based on instantaneous load, is very different from sizing a grid tied inverter, which is determined by the solar panel array size. In the case of an off-grid inverter, the inverter has to provide enough energy to all the AC loads, sometimes at the same time. Say you need to simultaneously power 3,000 Watts from various appliances. For an off-grid system, you’d need an inverter that could supply at least that amount. Note that the solar array size does not enter into this inverter sizing since the inverter pulls its power from the battery bank.

The ability of an off-grid inverter to surge to a higher level than its rated continuous output for a short duration to turn over the locked rotor of large loads like well pumps is critical. The inverter specifications that should be looked at are the Maximum Output Amps and the AC overload capability. If there are large loads a good number to look for is a five second surge capability of at least 1 ½ times the rated output of the inverter. If you have a deep well pump, the minimum requirement may be 3X the continuous run amps.
Reactive power—When the voltage and current waveforms for AC power are out of phase the resulting instantaneous power flow is modeled as real power and reactive power. The presence of reactive power increases the instantaneous current flow required to do work. The increase in current flow results in additional line losses. The utility tariff for larger customers may include a charge for reactive power compensation, measured in kilo-volt-amp-reactive.

Photovoltaic solar panels absorb sunlight as a source of energy to generate electricity. A photovoltaic (PV) module is a packaged, connected assembly of typically 6x10 photovoltaic solar cells. Photovoltaic modules constitute the photovoltaic array of a photovoltaic system that generates and supplies solar electricity in commercial and residential applications.

Use this worksheet to determine what size battery bank is required for your system. Battery size, or capacity, is measured in amp-hours. Battery voltage is determined by the number of "cells" in series. All lead-acid battery cells have a nominal output of 2 VDC. Actual cell voltage varies from about 1.7 VDC at full discharge to 2.4 VDC at full charge. 12 VDC lead-acid batteries are made of 6 separate cells in one case. 6 VDC batteries are made of 3 cells in one case. Putting battery cells in parallel increases amp-hour capacity, but does not change voltage.
Photovoltaic solar panels absorb sunlight as a source of energy to generate electricity. A photovoltaic (PV) module is a packaged, connected assembly of typically 6x10 photovoltaic solar cells. Photovoltaic modules constitute the photovoltaic array of a photovoltaic system that generates and supplies solar electricity in commercial and residential applications.
When it is sunny, regardless of outdoor temperature, pop cans (painted black) heat up very quickly. The fan drives cold air from inside of the home, through heated pop-cans and then back into the room. During this journey air collects the heat from can wall and brings it into the room. Read the following post if you are looking for more details about how solar thermal system actually works.
Crystalline solar panels (both monocrystalline and polycrystalline solar panels are more efficient than thin-film solar panels. But, they’re also more costly because they are more pure. Monocrystalline solar panels have been found to capture about 18-21% of the sun’s rays, where thin-film solar panels average around 15%. All panels have an average life span of 25+ years; crystalline silicon solar panels have lifespans up to 40 years. Intuitively, the more efficient the panels, the less you’ll need to buy.

Because wind speeds increase with height, the turbine is mounted on a tower. In general, the higher the tower, the more power the wind system can produce. The tower also raises the turbine above the air turbulence that can exist close to the ground because of obstructions such as hills, buildings, and trees. A general rule of thumb is to install a wind turbine on a tower with the bottom of the rotor blades at least 30 feet (9 meters) above any obstacle that is within 300 feet (90 meters) of the tower.[14] Relatively small investments in increased tower height can yield very high rates of return in power production.
Most locations getting a permit is a relatively easy task – it doesn’t require being a master electrician. In the vast majority of places you don’t need to be a licensed electrician in order to do electrical work on your own home. Anyone who’s done electrical work on their house (like adding an outlet, or rewiring a bathroom) will likely have gotten a permit for it (or should have.) So should be familiar with most of the permitting process. If they haven’t done any electrical work like that previously, then probably installing solar isn’t a good time for them to learn electrical skills.

Because residential solar energy systems are a big investment, you’ll want the system installed correctly and to full functionality. With this type of investment, it seems more effective to rely on the professionals who do these types of installations daily. Most residential solar systems can be installed in about two days. And solar consultants will monitor your energy usage and recommend the best system for your needs and the best placement to optimize solar energy conversion.
My position is that solar is not good enough for places that are not sunny most of the year, and that includes most of the North East USA. In a few years, when the panel efficiency gets greater with the retail sale of dual-gate and possibly tri-gate or more gate solar panels, then we will have something. Folks should install what works right for their area, and in much of the US, solar is a good idea; just not all of it, not yet.
I’m working on getting the power company (which is owned by our small city) to change this policy, however, since they recently announced a goal of moving to 100% renewable power by 2030. I’m one of the few people who will make the switch even if it costs me MORE than coal-generated electricity, so I don’t actually care about the payback period. But most people require a financial incentive to make a change.
"Wholesale Solar and John Grenvik where a pleasure to do business with. I found it interesting and quite unusual that John would not let me up-size my battery bank beyond what my panels would support on my off grid system, as he said I would be destroying the batteries by their not getting a full charge. How's that for looking out for the customer even at the expense of additional sales."
Thanks for the sharing your thoughts Brian! I live in IL and wondering if the numbers would make more sense if I installed a system with a small battery backup like you suggest. Would you mind sharing a typical system that you would install for a 1000 sq ft ranch house.. maybe with the with/without option to charge a Chevy Volt at night? Also, what is the typical payback that you have seen with this style of setup?
From a strictly financial perspective, I’m still not sold. The returns you mentioned (about 12%) are great but aren’t factoring in the loss of principle. I suppose the system will have value in the future for resale, but I have a hunch in ten years that setup will be laughably outdated. Not as outdated as no setup, however :) But it’s not all about the money, and I appreciate the clear info. It looks much more DIY than I thought.
Is my state an SREC state? Roughly 30 states plus the District require power companies to generate a portion of their electricity from renewable sources such as solar. Power companies will pay you to help them do this. SREC stands for solar renewable energy certificate. For every 1,000 kilowatt hours of solar power you generate, you earn one SREC. Your utility will buy it from you — for as much as $480 in some areas.
The top features of the SMA SunnyBoy TL-US Series. Secure power supply, dual mppt tracking, and opti trac global peak. Secure pOptiTrac™ Global Peak, SMA’s shadetolerant MPP tracking algorithm, quickly adjusts to changes in solar irradiation, which mitigates the effects of shade and results in higher total power output. And, with two MPP trackers, the TL-US series can ably handle complex roofs with multiple orientations.

Keep in the mind the costs associated with mounting your solar energy systems. You’ll need racking equipment to attach the solar panels to your roof and you’ll need the correct mounting system for your yard as well. And also keep in mind you need to really research the best positioning of the system to maximize the amount of sunlight you capture, taking into account the location of the sun during peak sunlight hours in addition to the location of any shade inhibiting objects (e.g., trees, buildings). Even one panel that is blocked from the sun due to a shade tree can inhibit the efficiency of the entire solar energy system.


Next step is preparation, protection and painting of timber box (solar panel housing). Special hooks have to be attached to all four corners of the solar collector, so that it can be easily mounted on the wall (Fig. 16) using 10mm/0.4in screws (Fig. 17). Empty box is placed on the wall in order to precisely mark the spot for drilling the air inlet/exhaust.
At the back side I made a big circular hole just behind the inverter fan for fresh air suction from the outside. Later I covered the hole with plastic wire mesh. A few small holes are also made for inserting the wires from the solar panel, charge controller and inverter to the battery and AC output to the appliances. At both sides 3 horizontal holes are provided for sufficient ventilation. A glass window is provided at the front side to view the different led indications on the inverter.
Over the past 2 years, WindEnergy7.com has been forming a customer/dealer & distributor network, involvement is openly being encouraged to all interested. The opportunity is available to customers who have purchased a system to get their local territory. If you buy a system, you can become a dealer with no further investment. There’s a very simple agreement and structure, all win/win.
We’re in Colorado and we’ve had our solar system for maybe eight years or so. While the snow will definitely melt on its own, my husband makes a hobby of clearing it off with a ladder and a very long window-washing apparatus. I imagine his snow-removal activities get the panels back into action 24-48 hours earlier than Mother Nature would have done. Our panels have held up perfectly in even the most extreme hail. In fact, our roof was damaged to the point of needing replacement by a hail storm just a couple of years after the panels were installed. Our homeowner’s insurance paid for the cost of the panels to be removed and then put back in place for the roof replacement. We took that opportunity to have another seven panels added when they went back up, since we had just gotten our electric car and needed more power.

First, you’ll need some wood to attach the solar cells to called the substrate.  You can use whatever you have laying around like cheap fiberboard.  Make a 3×6 inch template with a piece of paper and draw out where you cells will lay on the substrate.  After you have things drawn out the way your want, cut the substrate with a little room around the edges.
Before you go searching for websites that sell solar kits the first thing you should do is get at least one quote from a full-service solar company. You can do that online through our solar panels estimator. The advantages of this are that you find out what the cost of the competing option to a DIY solar project (a full-service installation) costs. You need to know this to know whether all the individual costs you face when doing a DIY installation (panels, inverters, racking, electrical sundries, service board upgrades, installation labor, permitting and inspections) are actually worth it. Click here to learn how much a solar installation for your home will cost.
Flagging—The deformation of local vegetation toward one direction, indicating the prevailing wind direction and relative strength (more formally called Krummholtz formation). Flagging is sometimes used with the Beaufort scale to generate an initial estimate of local site conditions. (Note: flagging does not determine the wind resource, but is a confirming indicator of it. For example, sometimes flagging is the result of sunlight availability, or trimming of tree branches near electrical lines. The assessor needs to understand when flagging is relevant, or when it is a confirming indicator of another condition at the site.)
I put caulk on the backs of each cell in a column of 9, then picked the whole column up by the tabs at the top and carefully laid the column down on the substrate.  My daughter helped me keep everything lined up properly as you can see in the picture.  (This is a great project to do with your kids, by the way!)  These are homemade solar panels so the gaps between cells and the columns aren’t precise.  I don’t think it had any impact on power output so don’t think you need to be perfect.
Daily energy budget? It is NOT based on a homes sq. ft. It is NOT based on how many people are living in the house. It is based on the equipment or appliances you want to run and how long each day you typically run them. It does not get more individual than that. The amount of energy you and your family consumes each day will vary among individuals habits and personal choices.

A solar charge controller is a device which is placed between a solar panel and a battery. It regulates the voltage and current coming from your solar panels. It is used to maintain the proper charging voltage on the batteries. As the input voltage from the solar panel rises, the charge controller regulates the charge to the batteries preventing any over charging.


So how does a seemingly simple looking panel harness sunlight and transform it into electricity? Solar panels contain photovoltaic cells. These cells are where the conversion from light to electricity takes place. The cells must be made of a material like silicon or a similar single cell semi-conducting material. As light enters the cells, the semi-conductor pulls the energy in the form of electrons from it and allows them to flow through the material. In essence, this flow is actually a current. While the absorption of the light into the cell is enough to free electrons, the cells also contain an electric field that can steer the electrons where they need to go. The current is then steered to the bottom of the panel where it can then be collected and drawn for use externally.
So he's having to carefully conserve so much that it has changed his lifestyle. Meanwhile, with my grid tie system, I'm able to run the A/C, hairdriers, TVs, anything I want, and still spend no money for power. Looking at his roof, my system is about 1/3 of his size, physically. There is one difference: If the power goes out, I have no power, but he does. To me, having all the power I want, when I need it, for free, I can suffer through an outage once or twice a year. So even if he didn't have any battery cost whatsoever, I would never advise anyone to do what he did, unless they are just really into it. For him, it's a hobby, a labor of love, and all that. That's great for him, but it's not what most people are in this for, they just want to save money or get off the grid without understanding the ramifications. Even if there WAS a ROI, you'd have to value your time at zero to realize that.

Rated power of a wind turbine may not be quite as meaningless as cut-in wind speed, though its use is limited. It could have some utility to quickly compare, or get a feel for, the size of the wind turbine, but only if those rated power numbers were taken at the same rated wind speed, and if the manufacturer is giving you a realistic number (many inflate rated power). A much better measure of turbine size is, simply, their diameter. As shown above it is by far the best predictor for power output.
Interestingly, different from solar, wind turbines are capable to produce power round-the-clock depending on the availability of wind, though. So an addition of a wind turbine to your rooftop solar system guarantees you unlimited green energy. Typically, a wind generator includes a turbine and a built-in charge controller. You need to mount it on a pole and link to your grid. Check our list of residential wind turbines below.
Great questions….Offsite is not too bad, the inverter doesn’t have to be adjacent to the panels and depending on your climate can easily be outside. Heat is the biggest degrading factor on the inverter’s efficiency so a shaded location is perfect. To calculate the size of wire from the panels to the inverter I used the company (Alt E) that I bought the panels from. They also provided a basic wiring diagram for the permitting process. You can also do the math yourself and they (Alt E) have some very detailed videos to help. Basically, you need the percent loss your are willing to accept (I used 1%), max average temp (+10 degrees) of the site, the distance and the amperage of the array and the max voltage…..For example my Vmax was 450 at 9amps running 200′ in Florida (I think I used 31 degrees C ) and ended up with 8 AWG copper. Not cheap but easy enough.
Because residential solar energy systems are a big investment, you’ll want the system installed correctly and to full functionality. With this type of investment, it seems more effective to rely on the professionals who do these types of installations daily. Most residential solar systems can be installed in about two days. And solar consultants will monitor your energy usage and recommend the best system for your needs and the best placement to optimize solar energy conversion.
The first step to planning your system is to evaluate rebate options and obtain permits. Your local power utility has rules you must follow when you hook the finished system to the grid, and building codes may also apply. In addition to federal incentives, states (and even some cities) offer rebates to help with the cost of the system. Understanding the local rules before you start will save you frustration later.
Air intake and exhaust junction box for diy solar panels is made using wood or aluminum, 1mm/0.04in thick (Images 11 and 12). Gaps around the edges are filled with adhesive tape or heat-resistant silicone. 55mm/2.16in diameter cut-outs are drilled on one side of intake/exhaust box. Drilled parts can be seen on images 12 and 13. This is where the first row of cans will be glued to the air intake/exhaust boxes. Check out how it looks when all parts are assembled and prepared for painting (Image 13).
Photovoltaic modules use light energy (photons) from the Sun to generate electricity through the photovoltaic effect. The majority of modules use wafer-based crystalline silicon cells or thin-film cells. The structural (load carrying) member of a module can either be the top layer or the back layer. Cells must also be protected from mechanical damage and moisture. Most modules are rigid, but semi-flexible ones based on thin-film cells are also available. The cells must be connected electrically in series, one to another.
Its handbook is written keeping the ease-of-understanding in mind so to make the installation and maintenance smoother. This well-crafted model possesses a feathery weight of 17.3 pounds. Yet there’s no chance of doubting its endurance. Because applying the trademarked PMG and the exceptional stator, the Popsport Wind Generator lessens torque resistance and solidifies the gadget.
Wire the solar panel: At the back sides of the solar panel there is a small junction box with positive and negative sign for polarity. In a large size solar panel this junction box have terminal wires with MC4 connector but for small size panels you have to connect the junction box with external wires. Always try to use red and black wire for the positive and negative terminal connection. If there is provision for earth wire the use a green wire for wiring this.
I normally don't write reviews but I am very pleased with the panels I got here. I purchased the first panel to keep a trailer battery and a few other things charged but I soon found more things to connect and added two more panels as needed. I'm now running my work trailer totally off solar and have three old batteries being charged to help when needed. I have a freezer and microwave, drill press and other tools plus music and the lights and no longer need to bother with finding a place to park near a power source or use a generator when I get to a job. very pleased.
I've actually constructed solar panels for my house and a couple family members' homes. However, I used a solar panel kit rather than recycled photovoltaic cells. I'm sure this is a cheaper method (by far), but it definitely sounds a bit more technical. If this is your first attempt to construct a solar panel, I recommend using a kit rather than building it from recycled cells. I followed the directions at Do It Yourself Energy, which has numerous guides on both solar and wind energy.
I love the idea of DIY solar and being self sufficient, but I think it needs to be done in a fair way. Hopefully when batteries get cheap enough we can get people to buy solar + storage, have essentially no electricity bill, and still don’t cost other people money. Even then though you will be relying on the grid during some winter weeks (buying 10+ powerwalls to ride through a week of bad solar does not seem like a healthy financial decision), so I am not sure this would work.
If you do have a suitably sunlit rooftop to work with, Weissman says, make sure it’s in good shape structurally. Solar installations these days can come with warranties for 20 or 25 years. If your roof will need a renovation a few years down the road, it’ll be easier to take care of that before the array goes up. That way, you won’t have to pay in extra time and money to disconnect your panels during the roof renovation and put them up again afterwards. While you’re at it, make sure you won’t run afoul of any homeowners’ association covenants that ban rooftop solar for aesthetic reasons.

I found that the best way to connect between two cells was to use hot glue and some conductive mesh. The mesh is good since it allows light to come through it, and we all love glue guns. So all you need to do is glue the mesh onto the solar cell surface. Its always better to have a longer strip of mesh on the surface, with a big enough shared surface space between the two. Always check with a multimeter that there is connectivity, and that there is voltage coming through. Its a bummer later to try and figure out where the problem is.


When you decide to DIY your solar panels, remember that you get what you pay for. A home solar kit may be less expensive, but solar installers offer tremendous value for relatively little additional cost (remember that ten percent figure?). When it comes to installing an expensive electrical system on your property, finding someone who knows what they’re doing can actually save you both time and money in the long run.
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