This step is better with two people, especially on a steep roof. Starting at the furthest corner from the location of your inverter, connect each the panel’s wires to the matching ones on its host inverter. Set the panels down straight, and use the click-in clamps that come with the racking system to clamp down the panel using your cordless drill/driver.
Betz limit—The maximum power coefficient (Cp) of a theoretically perfect wind turbine equal to 16/27 (59.3%) as proven by German physicist Albert Betz in 1919. This is the maximum amount of power that can be captured from the wind. In reality, this limit is never achived because of drag, electrical losses, and mechanical inefficiencies. See also Cp.*

Moreover, the kit has a unit of Eco-Worthy’s wind and solar hybrid controller, and other accessories like wires and cables. So it is easy for you to set up a solar-wind hybrid off-grid power station in your home. That would ensure you a more reliable alternative energy source. Use the link below to buy a unit of 1000W Eco-Worthy solar wind power kit. You also have other variants of the solar-wind kit there.

The downside is the rising costs of wind machines. One would normally expect prices to go down as technology became more advanced and available, but statistics show that turbine prices have increased more than 70% for land-based turbines and almost 50% for offshore wind turbines. The price hike has made offshore wind turbines cost a half and three million dollars per megawatt of capacity, and land based turbines, two million dollars per MW.
Here’s the deal: For a home wind turbine to be worth your investment, you really need to live on an acre or more. That’s the guideline from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Guide to Small Wind Electric Systems, a free publication for homeowners. Living in a rural area helps, because if you’re in a residential neighborhood, you’re likely to run into conflicts with zoning and local homeowners associations. Additionally, you’re more likely to find a high average wind speed in wide open spaces far from windbreaks such as buildings and trees. Altogether, while installing a small wind turbine in a city or suburb is certainly possible, you’re much more likely to have the right conditions for home wind power if you live well outside city limits.
It is pretty well known at this point that Mr. Money Mustache is enamored with solar power. Besides the obvious Sci-Fi coolness of it (Electricity, Satellites, Futuristic Robots!) and the eco-friendliness of it (energy with zero noise or pollution), in the last five years the money side of things has finally matured, so that solar power is now the cheapest way to make electricity – even before you account for the added bonus of any available subsidies and the benefits of pollution-free living.
This can get a bit tricky, but once you get the hang of it, can be done fast enough. First, some technical notes: In order to get higher voltage, you need to connect two cells in series. This means that the negative part of the first connects to the positive part of the second. As you continue to add more cells in series, you will get a higher voltage from side to side on your solar strip. This is all good, but if your cells are small-ish, they won't generate much amperage. So even if you have a high voltage, you probably won't be able to give it any load (probably will hardly light an LED). In order to get higher amperage through the circuit, you need to connect cells in parallel (positive side to positive side, negative side to negative side). When you do this, make sure the positive and negative leads (copper mesh in this case) don't short themselves out.
Product options: Your solar product needs to be your first consideration. Not every solar kit comes with the same products! Indeed one of the biggest problems with solar panel kits is that because they are targeting very price sensitive customers, many offer very low-quality solar brands. As well as a variance in equipment quality there is also a variance from website to website in what actually comes in a kit. Some solar kits come only with panels and inverters. Some kits include racking devices, while others include all the above along with minor electrical items (like circuit breakers) to offer a comprehensive solar solution. You will need to know what you require before ordering a kit and you will probably need to ask the installer you are going to get to install the system what he or she will need you to provide in terms of equipment.

Varied wind resources can exist within the same property. In addition to measuring or finding the annual wind speeds, you need to know about the prevailing directions of the wind at your site. Knowing the prevailing wind direction(s) is essential to determining the impact of obstacles and landforms when seeking the best available site location and estimating the wind resource at that location. To help with this process, small wind site assessors typically develop a wind rose, which shows the wind direction distributions of a given area. The wind rose divides a compass into sectors (usually 8 or 16) and indicates the average wind speed, average percentage of time that the wind blows from each direction, and/or the percentage of energy in the wind by sector. Wind roses can be generated based on annual average wind speeds, or by season, month, or even time of day as needed.[30]
Wafer thin lightweight and can mold to a Wafer thin lightweight and can mold to a curved surface. These Semi-Flexible Solar Panels are made of the high efficiency mono-crystalline solar cells and strong enough to be walked on. Semi-flexible Panels are weather water and corrosion resistant making them a perfect option for marine applications RVs camping and emergency ...  More + Product Details Close
Overall, the main reason people choose DIY solar panel installation is the potential cost savings. There are two ways to save costs – buy the solar power kit and install it yourself or buy the kit and get a professional to install it. The cost savings are pretty substantial when you think of it – you might be able to reduce your purchase price of the solar panels from $4 per watt to $2 per watt. For a common 5 kW solar energy system, that could mean a cost savings of $10,000 right off the bat. That’s a 50% discount and seems pretty good, right? Well. . .maybe.
Making polycrystalline panels is cheaper and it's a newer technology. The silicon cools unevenly and creates many different crystals giving it a less uniform appearance. Polycrystalline solar panels tend to be the most affordable, but they also put out a little less power. Even so, poly panels are gaining in efficiency and will usually have the lowest price per watt.

These machines range micro turbines with a capacity of 50 kilowatts to large turbines with capacities in megawatts. Naturally, the price will go up as the turbine capacity increases. Another classification is according to the turbine environment. There are turbines for low wind areas that have a large rotor, and there are turbines for high wind areas with small rotors. Low wind turbines cost more than high wind units since they have to be a lot more efficient because of the absence of high wind speeds helping increase electricity generation.

Wafer thin lightweight and can mold to a Wafer thin lightweight and can mold to a curved surface. These Semi-Flexible Solar Panels are made of the high efficiency mono-crystalline solar cells and strong enough to be walked on. Semi-flexible Panels are weather water and corrosion resistant making them a perfect option for marine applications RVs camping and emergency ...  More + Product Details Close

Prior to conducting an on-site measurement campaign, some small wind project developers use state wind maps to conservatively estimate the wind resource at turbine hub height. While these maps can provide a general indication of good or poor wind resources, they do not provide a resolution high enough to identify local site features. State wind maps cannot include information on complex terrain, ground cover, wind speed distribution, direction distribution, turbulence intensity, and other local effects. Purchased maps or services can often provide higher resolution and more flexibility with zooming, orientation, and additional features. Pay attention to a map's height above ground as it relates to the potential project's tower height. Adjusting the wind speed for the height difference between the map and the turbine height adds a potential source of error depending on the wind shear exponent that is selected, and the greater the height difference the greater the potential error. Therefore, for small wind generator applications, 30- to 40-m wind maps are far more useful than 10-, 60-, 80-, or 100-m wind maps. It is also important to understand the resolution of the wind map or model-generated data set. If the resolution is lower than the terrain features, adjustments will be needed to account for local terrain effects.[26]
I would recommend micro-inverters on each panel if shading is an issue. That way only the panel with shade will suffer from power degradation as opposed to the entire array suffering when using a single inverter. They also give you ability to monitor each panel on-line for performance/issues etc. Makes troubleshooting a breeze. Also when factoring in future performance don’t forget to include panel power degradation. After roughly 20 years you should still be seeing at least 80% output from the panels themselves though, so not a huge issue.
In rigid thin-film modules, the cell and the module are manufactured in the same production line. The cell is created on a glass substrate or superstrate, and the electrical connections are created in situ, a so-called "monolithic integration". The substrate or superstrate is laminated with an encapsulant to a front or back sheet, usually another sheet of glass. The main cell technologies in this category are CdTe, or a-Si, or a-Si+uc-Si tandem, or CIGS (or variant). Amorphous silicon has a sunlight conversion rate of 6–12%
I’m sold in on solar from an environmental standpoint but still not at these prices even as a DIY. You have a lot of solar needs with multiple facilities and autos using the juice. We are just a middle-aged couple working from home in a small house. Our typical electric bill is $60/mo. I’m waiting for the price to come down much more and to become much easier to install DIY.
Preppers, survivalists and off-gridders have been cobbling together their own photovoltaic panels and set-ups from scratch for years, but as prices for factory-made PV panels have dropped and technology has improved, pre-configured arrays and kits are enabling less intrepid homeowners to install and maintain their own solar power systems and save considerable money in the process. 
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Buying a solar energy system will likely increase your home’s value. A recent study found that solar panels are viewed as upgrades, just like a renovated kitchen or a finished basement, and home buyers across the country have been willing to pay a premium of about $15,000 for a home with an average-sized solar array. Additionally, there is evidence homes with solar panels sell faster than those without. In 2008, California homes with energy efficient features and PV were found to sell faster than homes that consume more energy. Keep in mind, these studies focused on homeowner-owned solar arrays.
The era of solar energy, as many would say, is upon us. From astounding new solar products like AC coupled backup systems and high efficient microinverters to banks of solar panels that provide electricity to run our homes and, eventually, even our cities, the solar revolution may well have begun in earnest. Yet too most people, how solar actually works is a mystery. How do these panels convert sunlight into energy that homeowners can use to power their appliances and their homes, a practice that ultimately protects the environment and leads to cheaper utility bills and economic freedom?

Many municipalities must get kick backs from the electricians they are protecting with these mazes of codes.. Most solar/wind retailes have resorces and calculators to help you calculate fusing and wire size.. Changing out things in your own home even as simple as installing a GFI outlet require a permit and a certified electrician making them outragously expensive.. In my example you could be looking at $400 and the inconvience of having people nosing around your home several times.. If that inspector finds somthing he does not like you could be looking at hundreds or thousands of dollars more in costs or having them slap a condemned sticker on your home.. I have a 4kw system planned and am praying that the County Inspector is not a pain.. Could put in an isolated system with no inspection using my amateur radio license but I want interconnect with the power company.. Local power company has a very simple application system for interconnecting and all they require is an external labeled disconnect and a status light they install on the pole at the transformer cost $50..

Of course, this doesn’t take into account the fact that whoever built a power plant is now selling less kWh when the sun is shining, but that is the risk of that investment. The risk of installing rooftop solar is that the industry prevails over homeowner interests (some would say rights) and curtails your PV output instead of the power plant output.


Most locations getting a permit is a relatively easy task – it doesn’t require being a master electrician. In the vast majority of places you don’t need to be a licensed electrician in order to do electrical work on your own home. Anyone who’s done electrical work on their house (like adding an outlet, or rewiring a bathroom) will likely have gotten a permit for it (or should have.) So should be familiar with most of the permitting process. If they haven’t done any electrical work like that previously, then probably installing solar isn’t a good time for them to learn electrical skills.

The Interstate Turbine Advisory Council (ITAC) compiles a national unified list of small and mid-size wind turbines eligible for incentive funding from ITAC state and utility member programs. In addition to requiring certification for small wind turbines, ITAC reviews manufacturers' consumer and dealer services, marketing consistency with third-party testing, turbine operational history, turbine warranty, and manufacturers' response to technical problems, failures, and customer complaints. As a collaborative and common inventory of turbines, the unified list assures customers that tax- or rate-payer funding fully supports the installation of reliable and safe technology as well as enables improvements in program consistency, transparency, and benefits.[19]
Our recommendation is the Renogy 100 Watts 12 Volts Monocrystalline Solar Starter Kit. It features a highly efficient monocrystalline panel, is built in the USA and offers good value as a starter kit.  Because it uses monocrystalline panels, it is lighter (19.8 lbs) and smaller dimensions that kits that use polycrystalline panels, which makes a difference for RV or boating applications. It can also be expanded up to 400Ws.
Over the past 2 years, WindEnergy7.com has been forming a customer/dealer & distributor network, involvement is openly being encouraged to all interested. The opportunity is available to customers who have purchased a system to get their local territory. If you buy a system, you can become a dealer with no further investment. There’s a very simple agreement and structure, all win/win.
The new HO series system can run on the grid as a "Grid-Tie" or it can run in a rural setting with no grid power at all. The system is very versatile to be able to run as a Grid-Tie or an Off-Grid system. So, if you are interested in the new HO Series turbine here are some links to videos of the system in action, this is a grid tied system and we can still sell you any size that fits your budget in time to take that tax credit.
Thanks for the write up. Very interesting. Being concerned about the carbon output as well, has there been any research into the CO2 produced in the production of the material being installed? I was really convicted about this concern when I started considering the CO2 given off by things like spray foam on building projects I have done in the past.

Stand-alone systems (systems not connected to the utility grid) require batteries to store excess power generated for use when the wind is calm. They also need a charge controller to keep the batteries from overcharging. Deep-cycle batteries, such as those used for golf carts, can discharge and recharge 80% of their capacity hundreds of times, which makes them a good option for remote renewable energy systems. Automotive batteries are shallow-cycle batteries and should not be used in renewable energy systems because of their short life in deep-cycling operations.[16]
The tables above are for HAWTs, the regular horizontal “wind mill” type we are all familiar with. For VAWTs the tables can be used as well, but you have to convert their dimensions. Calculate the frontal area (swept area) of the VAWT by multiplying height and width, or for a curved egg-beater approximate the area. Now convert the surface area to a diameter, as if it were a circle: Diameter = √(4 • Area / Pi). That will give you a diameter for the table. Look up the energy production for that diameter and your average annual wind speed and do the following:
Once you figure out where to put the long “lines” shown above, you measure them out and snap chalk lines right over top of your existing roof material. Then, use some sturdy 2.5″ lag bolts and washers to hold down the L-shaped brackets that come with the solar racking kit. Pre-drill each hole, and inject in some “Through the Roof” sealant with a normal caulk gun before driving in those bolts – this creates a permanent watertight seal. (There are also special brackets to accommodate different roof styles like tile and metal).
At the back side I made a big circular hole just behind the inverter fan for fresh air suction from the outside. Later I covered the hole with plastic wire mesh. A few small holes are also made for inserting the wires from the solar panel, charge controller and inverter to the battery and AC output to the appliances. At both sides 3 horizontal holes are provided for sufficient ventilation. A glass window is provided at the front side to view the different led indications on the inverter.
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We put in our home wind turbines in the fall and started making power. Then, Congress passed the bailout bill this fall, it added a 30% tax credit for small-wind projects. So, our investment qualifies for a tax credit there. Additionally our electricity company announced electricity rate hikes of 15% for each of next three years. That's about 50% alltogether. Electricity costs, rising sharply but with LED Bulbs and ...
Overall, is saving $2,000 worth it to go through the headache of DIY installation? Perhaps you enjoy the challenge of a good home improvement project and have the time to devote to the scale of this project. Then DIY residential solar energy installation might be for you. For the most of us though, it’s easier and it’ll give you better peace of mind if you turn to the professionals.
Once you figure out where to put the long “lines” shown above, you measure them out and snap chalk lines right over top of your existing roof material. Then, use some sturdy 2.5″ lag bolts and washers to hold down the L-shaped brackets that come with the solar racking kit. Pre-drill each hole, and inject in some “Through the Roof” sealant with a normal caulk gun before driving in those bolts – this creates a permanent watertight seal. (There are also special brackets to accommodate different roof styles like tile and metal).
At the back side I made a big circular hole just behind the inverter fan for fresh air suction from the outside. Later I covered the hole with plastic wire mesh. A few small holes are also made for inserting the wires from the solar panel, charge controller and inverter to the battery and AC output to the appliances. At both sides 3 horizontal holes are provided for sufficient ventilation. A glass window is provided at the front side to view the different led indications on the inverter.
Solar panels come in two types; monocrystalline and polycrystalline. Where home or cabin owner wants their solar installation to be grid tied, off-grid or emergency solar backup each of those systems starts with a solar panel selection. Monocrystalline solar panels are generally higher efficiency, but they tend to derate faster in hotter conditions. Polycrystalline are sometimes considered a better choice for warmer climates, but the truth is that either panel type is so similar the differences are relatively not worth comparing.

When contemplating installing a residential wind turbine on your property, it is important to know how this energy saving resource works. A typical wind power system is made of a wind tower and a turbine with multiple blades. The wind spins the blades, converting the wind energy into electricity. The height of the wind tower varies depending on the location of your house. The wind turbine blades collect the wind energy that is then converted to an electrical current that is compatible with your home. In a typical residential application, electrical power is provided by the wind turbine and the local utility. In essence, you can harness free energy from the wind, and use this energy to supplement the energy you are currently purchasing from other utilities.

I think there’s some animosity between people who mistakenly think that power companies are against solar panels on homes. What’s often overlooked though is that power companies don’t just charge you for power. They are also charging you for all of the infrastructure required to deliver that power to you. So, if your normal power bill is $100 and through use of solar panels and net metering, you drive that cost down to zero, the power company isn’t recovering any of the costs associated with your home being tied to the grid.
Yes, this Nevada homeowner, working off our drawings and instructions, installed this 12 panel off-grid system himself. Every do-it-yourselfer knows the feeling of pride that comes with completing a project oneself and knowing that it's a job well done. Saving up to 50% over a professional installation by installing a solar kit while still receiving the federal tax credits and local incentives translates to thousands of dollars in savings down the road. It also means that it's going to take far less time for the kit to pay for itself through the electricity cost savings it will reap each year. This is a no-lose investment that effectively trumps anything happening on Wall Street. A pole mount solar system has to be among the most fun things you can plant with the added benefit of watching your savings grow. Don't take our word for it. Look at this customers face. You will be the envy of all your neighbors.
Paying to have solar panels cleaned is often not a good investment; researchers found panels that had not been cleaned, or rained on, for 145 days during a summer drought in California, lost only 7.4% of their efficiency. Overall, for a typical residential solar system of 5 kW, washing panels halfway through the summer would translate into a mere $20 gain in electricity production until the summer drought ends—in about 2 ½ months. For larger commercial rooftop systems, the financial losses are bigger but still rarely enough to warrant the cost of washing the panels. On average, panels lost a little less than 0.05% of their overall efficiency per day.[28]
Thanks for the write up. Very interesting. Being concerned about the carbon output as well, has there been any research into the CO2 produced in the production of the material being installed? I was really convicted about this concern when I started considering the CO2 given off by things like spray foam on building projects I have done in the past.
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