Wind Resource Considerations -- If you live in complex terrain, take care in selecting the installation site. If you site your wind turbine on the top of or on the windy side of a hill, for example, you will have more access to prevailing winds than in a gully or on the leeward (sheltered) side of a hill on the same property. You can have varied wind resources within the same property. In addition to measuring or finding out about the annual wind speeds, you need to know about the prevailing directions of the wind at your site. In addition to geological formations, you need to consider existing obstacles, such as trees, houses, and sheds. You also need to plan for future obstructions, such as new buildings or trees that have not reached their full height. Your turbine needs to be sited upwind of any buildings and trees, and it needs to be 30 feet above anything within 300 feet.
I don’t own, but I hope that some of the landlords that read your blog see this article! My apartment complex recently put panels up on the main office as a “test drive” for the rest of the complex. Renting makes sense for me in the big city, but I hate that renting usually equals bad environmental choices. The costs benefit analysis is probably fuzzier when utilities are paid by the renter though. I’m thinking my complex will shift their policy if they really go for solar so that they get the surplus returns!
It is unfortunate to see how well marketing for small wind turbines is working: I often see people post questions on forums, where they are looking for a wind turbine “with a low cut-in wind speed”. Depending on whom you ask, the cut-in wind speed is either the wind speed where the turbine starts turning, or the wind speed where it starts to produce some power. For most wind turbines it is around 2.5 – 3.5 m/s (5.5 – 8 mph), and it is an utterly meaningless parameter.

After the cells are attached so the substrate, finish the wiring by using extra tabbing or wires to attach the 4 columns of 9 cells in series.  To know what to attach to what, visualize all of the columns connected together in one big column.  Remember which tabs would be connected together in this arrangement and make the same connections in the 4 columns of 9.
In addition to zoning issues, your neighbors might object to a wind turbine that blocks their view, or they might be concerned about the sound it produces. Most zoning and aesthetic concerns can be addressed by supplying objective data. For example, a typical 2-kilowatt wind turbine operates at a noise level of approximately 55 dB 50 feet away from the hub of the turbine.[10] At that level, the sound of the wind turbine can be picked out of surrounding noise if a conscious effort is made to hear it.
From a strictly financial perspective, I’m still not sold. The returns you mentioned (about 12%) are great but aren’t factoring in the loss of principle. I suppose the system will have value in the future for resale, but I have a hunch in ten years that setup will be laughably outdated. Not as outdated as no setup, however :) But it’s not all about the money, and I appreciate the clear info. It looks much more DIY than I thought.
Local, state, and federal rebates for solar panels often require that a licensed installer do the work in order to qualify. Missing out on rebates and tax incentives can mean losing a significant amount of money. Not only will your installer make you eligible for this cash, they’ll also know which incentives will work for you, and can help you apply.
For this last part, you’ll need to know what a net metering agreement is. Net metering is when your local utility company agrees to provide energy credits for any surplus power you produce and send back to the grid. In some cases, these credits can roll over so you accrue them long-term, and some utilities will even cut you a check for your power production credits.
Eventually, we should realize that net-metering is an incentive (needed at first to jump-start the rooftop solar industry), and that retail-wholesale rates are fairer to the utility and community all around. Net metering is when you over-produce in the summer, and get those kWhs back in the winter for free–you haven’t paid the utility for the transport and “storage” of the energy. Retail-wholesale is when the utility pays you the same rate they pay other power plants for each kWh (usually 1/2 to 1/3 the rate on your bill), and whenever you consume from the grid (evenings, cloudy days, winter), you pay the normal cost. That way, you pay the utility the infrastructure cost for moving that energy around. We have that here now, and I think it’s the way forward. But now, what they want to do is curtail the homeowner solar: using smart meters (and smart inverters), they would automatically shut down your production (turn off your inverter) when they have too much electricity (from their own solar farms). You would have to agree to this in order to be grid-tied, and remember, when they shut down your inverter, you can’t even use your solar power yourself. I think this is purely for profit motives and has nothing to do with the purported technical reasons.
Wire the solar panel: At the back sides of the solar panel there is a small junction box with positive and negative sign for polarity. In a large size solar panel this junction box have terminal wires with MC4 connector but for small size panels you have to connect the junction box with external wires. Always try to use red and black wire for the positive and negative terminal connection. If there is provision for earth wire the use a green wire for wiring this.
If you do have a suitably sunlit rooftop to work with, Weissman says, make sure it’s in good shape structurally. Solar installations these days can come with warranties for 20 or 25 years. If your roof will need a renovation a few years down the road, it’ll be easier to take care of that before the array goes up. That way, you won’t have to pay in extra time and money to disconnect your panels during the roof renovation and put them up again afterwards. While you’re at it, make sure you won’t run afoul of any homeowners’ association covenants that ban rooftop solar for aesthetic reasons.
Is the wind resource at your site good enough to justify your investment in a small wind turbine system? That is a key question and not always easily answered. The wind resource can vary significantly over an area of just a few miles because of local terrain influences on the wind flow. Yet, there are steps you can take to answer the above question.
So how does a seemingly simple looking panel harness sunlight and transform it into electricity? Solar panels contain photovoltaic cells. These cells are where the conversion from light to electricity takes place. The cells must be made of a material like silicon or a similar single cell semi-conducting material. As light enters the cells, the semi-conductor pulls the energy in the form of electrons from it and allows them to flow through the material. In essence, this flow is actually a current. While the absorption of the light into the cell is enough to free electrons, the cells also contain an electric field that can steer the electrons where they need to go. The current is then steered to the bottom of the panel where it can then be collected and drawn for use externally.
Although wind energy systems involve a significant initial investment, they can be competitive with conventional energy sources when you account for a lifetime of reduced or avoided utility costs. The length of the payback period—the time before the savings resulting from your system equal the cost of the system—depends on the system you choose, the wind resource on your site, electricity costs in your area, and how you use your wind system.
My position is that solar is not good enough for places that are not sunny most of the year, and that includes most of the North East USA. In a few years, when the panel efficiency gets greater with the retail sale of dual-gate and possibly tri-gate or more gate solar panels, then we will have something. Folks should install what works right for their area, and in much of the US, solar is a good idea; just not all of it, not yet.
Find the nearest city to your home and write down the lowest daily sun hours. Divide your daily load calculation (+ 20%) use by lowest sun hours per day. For example, if the daily average electricity load demand is 5,000 watts, and the site is in Salt Lake City UT, you would take 5,000 watts X 20% = 6,000 watts less 1,270 watts produced by the wind turbine / 4 sun hours = 1,183 watt solar array. That means if you choose 250 watt panels you would need 5 - 6 solar panel kit. Especially for off-grid systems its a good idea to always round up, but this is where your budget comes into play and a personal choice to aggressively manage your daily energy usage.
Purchase This Brand New C60 Charge Controller and Watt Meter Combo Package Today! Limited Quantities Available! Call 1-866-606-3991. Purchase This 10-15 Watt 12V Wind Turbine Power Generator Today! Limited Quantities Available! Call 1-866-606-3991. Purchase This Brand New 10 Ft 1 1/2" Wind Generator Tower Wind Turbine Pole Kit Today! Limited Quantities Available! Call 1-866-606-3991.
Good points to make as i just recently designed my own mounts, but mine will be heavier duty than anything I’ve even seen in the USA since I’m mostly concerned about theft. I’m glad I’m outside the USA and don’t have to worry about all the paperwork, and since I’m a fabricator with a background in wiring, the only issue that I needed assistance with was the correct angle. Good reading and if I were in the US I would definitely hire someone to deal with all the headaches you mentioned.
Our largest solar panel. Portable rugged and powerful. Our largest solar panel. Portable rugged and powerful. Designed for mobile base camps and die-hard adventurers a standard MC4 connector for third-party charge controllers and built-in charging cable for Sherpa Power Packs and Goal Zero Yeti Solar Generators. Can be chained in series or parallel to collect more power from ...  More + Product Details Close
Can I use wind energy to power my home? More people across the country are asking this question as they look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre and larger sites, and 19.3% of the U.S. population lives in rural areas.[1] Small wind electric systems can contribute to our nation's energy needs.
It is hard to beat the advantages of solar: No moving parts. Warranties of 25 years are common for PV modules. No maintenance, other than the occasional hosing-off if you live in a dusty place. The installed price of a 6 kW wind turbine on a good height tower is about $50,000 (and we are not even counting the money you are going to sink into maintenance of that wind turbine). At the time of this writing, half that money will buy you about 7 kW of installed solar panels. In our not-so-sunny Ottawa location those solar modules will produce around 8,000 kWh of electrical energy per average year, and they will do that for 30 years or more.
Your situation is different than homeowners and businesses in the USA. Generally speaking, it’s not legal for someone to install their own system in the United States, since usually the permits have to be filled out by a Master Electrician and they aren’t going to do that without at least inspecting your work. Plus most incentives will only be paid to a licensed installer, so a person wouldn’t really come out ahead anyway. Given that you are concerned primarily with theft you may want to give some thought to a tracking device, instead of just making the mounts more durable.
I installed a DIY system last year and my biggest problem in Iowa was, it would snow, then get really cold. The snow would then basically freeze in place until it was well above freezing for a few days or even a week. I went out a couple times after it was above freezing with the hose and would spray them to help melt the snow. It also didn’t help that the bottom of my panels isn’t the bottom of the roof, so the snow will start sliding off the panels, then get caught by the snow stuck on the roof instead of falling to the ground. I’m not too worried about it this year though, because I’ve banked an almost 2Mw credit, from my little 3.8 kw system.

Because wind speeds increase with height, the turbine is mounted on a tower. In general, the higher the tower, the more power the wind system can produce. The tower also raises the turbine above the air turbulence that can exist close to the ground because of obstructions such as hills, buildings, and trees. A general rule of thumb is to install a wind turbine on a tower with the bottom of the rotor blades at least 30 feet (9 meters) above any obstacle that is within 300 feet (90 meters) of the tower.[14] Relatively small investments in increased tower height can yield very high rates of return in power production.
14 Feb 2013 at 3:17am --> . . http://WINDENERGY7.COM – WindEnergy7 LLC is a fast growing Wind and Solar Energy business. WindEnergy7’s founder has trained customers, dealers, and installers in about 40 states of the US from Hawaii to New York & Alaska with exports to Canada, Mexico, Asia, Africa, and Europe. //www.youtube.com/watch?v=MrkW4cfLCKI WindEnergy7 employs a dea...
I heard a speaker explain that he has off grid solar as a backup system. He and his wife got tired of feeding excess electricity to Virginia Power for pennies on the dollar, so they bought a used Nissan Leaf for $8000 or $9000 to soak up the extra electricity. He said that many people buy electric cars and then change their mind, so the prices on used electric cars are quite cheap. I checked out the prices and he’s right! The more I research, the more I’m convinced we can afford solar power if we pick and choose and don’t try to do everything at once.
✅ FEATURES: Integrated automatic braking system to protect from sudden and high wind speed. Easy DIY installation methods with all materials provided. Can be used in conjunction with solar panels. MPPT Maximum power point tracking built into the wind turbine generator. Made with high quality Polypropylene and Glass Fiber material with a weather resistant seal.

72-cell panels are commonly used for larger systems, especially utility-scale but also residential and commercial projects. Most 72-cell panels measure 77x40” with power output in the range of 325-400 watts. 72-cell panels are ideal for larger systems because the bigger size reduces the total number of connections and components, making for an easier installation with less maintenance.
Honestly, had I known my life as a supermom would involve these sophisticated equations and engineering concepts, I would have changed my Berkeley major from English to Engineering.  The way I see it, calculating my wind turbine’s kW requires the same intellect and imagination as conjuring the manifold meanings in “Nature never did betray the heart that loved her.”  C’mon, if I can do Wordsworth, surely I can do Watt times 1000.  “Wind turbine kW” will become my favorite metaphor for “dollars saved.”
The grid tied system – this system is connected to the national electricity grid. This type of turbine system will help reduce your consumption of utility supplied electricity. If the wind turbine doesn’t deliver enough energy then the grid makes up the difference. If the wind turbine makes too much energy then the excess can be sold to the utility. These systems make sense if your energy supplied by the utility is expensive, and their requirements for connecting your turbine to the grid are not too expensive.
The kit includes an integrated automatic braking system and also a manual braking switch. It is rated for 600W power and 31mph wind speed. It has both 12V and 24V systems and features an auto-detection mode. The suggested battery capacity for this turbine is 100A or larger. The digital MPPT charge controller is specially designed to always generate the maximum power output, and operates the safety features like auto breaking and battery over-charge protection.
Varied wind resources can exist within the same property. In addition to measuring or finding the annual wind speeds, you need to know about the prevailing directions of the wind at your site. Knowing the prevailing wind direction(s) is essential to determining the impact of obstacles and landforms when seeking the best available site location and estimating the wind resource at that location. To help with this process, small wind site assessors typically develop a wind rose, which shows the wind direction distributions of a given area. The wind rose divides a compass into sectors (usually 8 or 16) and indicates the average wind speed, average percentage of time that the wind blows from each direction, and/or the percentage of energy in the wind by sector. Wind roses can be generated based on annual average wind speeds, or by season, month, or even time of day as needed.[30]
Rural America has relied on wind power for decades. Even after the government completed rural electrification in 1964, far-flung communities continued generating much of their own power from hybrid diesel/wind systems. And the windmill remains a fixture on most American farms-not because it represents a cute and quaint testimonial to times past, but because it makes perfect economic sense. Many large farms connected to the grid only as a back-up for their own more ambitious wind turbine installations. Most American farmers and small manufacturers recognize the wisdom of buying wind turbines instead of paying for electricity. Soon, owners and operators of large industrial and office complexes ought to see a considerable financial advantage in buying wind turbines, too.

Wind turbines do work; put them in nice, smooth air and their energy production is quite predictable (we will get to predicting it a bit further on in this story). The honest manufacturers do not lie or exaggerate, their turbines really can work as advertised in smooth, laminar airflow. However, put that same turbine on a 40 feet tower and even if the annual average wind speed is still 5 m/s at that height, its energy production will fall far short of what you would predict for that value. How short is anybody’s guess, that is part of the point; it is impossible to predict the effect of turbulence other than that it robs the energy production potential of any wind turbine. Roof tops, or other locations on a house, make for poor turbine sites. They are usually very turbulent and on top of that their average wind speeds are usually very low.
Well, it is a one-piece turbine that starts to produce energy in 8mph winds. Its very efficient 15-in long propeller ensures you natural power in your home, RV, remote cabin, boats, or camp tent. You can quickly mount it anywhere. It also works along with a solar panel, giving you a chance to add a small wind generator to your existing off-grid power system.
In any generator whether it be a re manufactured delco permanent magnet alternator, our white lightning radial or even the larger axial flux designs different wire gauges can be used and are used for different reason for a given application. It is important also to understand that generally speaking when you are looking at a permanent magnet alternator for sale on our site ebay youtube Amazon ect when you see a voltage advertised such as frequently 12, 24, and 48 models this usually does not mean that there is some sort of internal regulator which limits the output voltage of the generator or pma to an adequate charging voltage level for an application This is one of the biggest mistake we see do it yourselfers make when selecting a generator. Typically sellers and manufacturers rate a permanent magnet alternator as for instance 12 volt when the RPM range of the generator is sufficient to reach Cut in Voltage to charge a given battery bank. Windmill, wind generators, wind chargers, or residential wind turbine kits terms we often see used interchangeably are trying to tell you that in a direct drive application with a particular blade set that they would use a particular generator for an application. So what’s the difference? Any style generator has a capacity “slots” or area that a winding can fit in. This will be unique to the particular generator. It is important to understand that within the working area different wire gauges can be used. In the area of the generator windings more “ turns” wraps or whatever terminology you prefer can fit in a given area with finer wire that with thicker wire as a matter of what will physically fit in a given stator coil, wrap , winding and or slot “again whatever terminology is appropriate for the given alternator.
This is a substantial piece of equipment for the entire residential solar energy system. Why? This is how you get to use the solar energy you capture in the solar panels to power your home energy needs. As stated above, the solar inverter is what converts DC power to AC power – the type of power of your home appliances, computers, and other residential power runs off of.
Equipped with a 3-phase External Rectifier pigtail. This small black connector on the back of the unit allows you to run less costly 3-conductor wire to your battery location instead of large heavy battery cables in addition to lessening the voltage loss you get with DC power. Once at the battery location the 3-phase power is fed into the included Charge Controller and is converted to DC for connection to the battery.
×